This is the "Home" page of the "Internet Sources for Research" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content

Internet Sources for Research  

Last Updated: Aug 22, 2016 URL: http://udc.libguides.com/internet Print Guide RSS Updates

Home Print Page
  Search: 
 
 

But I Can't Use Internet Sources!

Some professors think that using the internet or websites is an incorrect way to do research. What they don't realize is that there are multiple types of information available on the internet. To be sure, much of what you find on the internet is not trustworthy -- a lot of the content is biased or factually incorrect.

However, there are many resources out there that are valid and useful. It is your job to be able to tell the difference.

To learn more, visit the Critiquing Websites tab.

 

Did You Know?

What we know now as the "internet" began as an internal network for ARPA - the Advanced Research Projects Agency - in the early 1960s, during a time of increased military and scientific research, a result of the "space race" between the United States and the then-Soviet Union. (ARPA became the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.) This internal network, named ARPANET, was a way by which scientists could exchange information electronically between two specified points.

With advanced technological developments, the direct pre-cursor to the modern internet was developed during the 1970s and 1980s, by scientists in the United Kingdom and the United States.

The internet, as we know it, has only been in existence since the 1990s. The "World Wide Web" was introduced by CERN and created by Tim Berners-Lee.

The internet is not managed by a central governing body, rather it is a global, non-regulated interconnected system. Some technical aspects of the system are managed by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), particularly the creation of unique identifiers, such as URLs (domain names) and internet protocol (IP) numbers.

 

Introduction

This guide was created to augment a workshop series on researching and research paper skills presented jointly by the the Academic Support Center and the Learning Resources Division. It is intended as a permanent access point for information on appropriate internet resources for college-level research; it is a "living" document, meaning that it will be updated periodically to reflect the evolving nature of both internet sources and the library's collection. If you have comments or suggestions, please don't hesitate to contact me!
 

 

 

How to Use This Guide

Each one of these pages will direct you to various resources that you can access via the internet. Each tab represents a page. Each page will include links to the highlighted resources.

If you have questions, please use the information listed on the right hand side of the page -- my email address and phone number are listed there. Also, if I am logged into chat there will be a chat box open - if you need immediate help, don't hesitate to contact me through the chat box.

 

 

A "map" of the internet, created by the Opte Project in 2005. Each of the color strands represent a domain type (such as .org, .mil, .gov) and country of origin.

Subject Guide

Profile Image
Faith Rusk
Contact Info
202-274-6116
Send Email
 

What Do You Think?

Was this information helpful?

How useful is this page?
(1 = Not Useful, 5 = Very Useful!)

Additional comments:


Your Email:


Description

Loading  Loading...

Tip